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Improving Team performance

High Performers Versus Low Performers – 7 Ways to Tell the Difference

Barbara Brown, PhD asked:

What’s the difference between a high-performer and low-performer?  That question occurred to me after reading findings from the company Leadership IQ.  Out of 16,237 employees, only 3,896 self-identified as high-performers!  If you move beyond the shocking realization that everyone did not label themselves as high-performers, you might come to the realization (shocking or not so shocking) that employees know how good they are.  

But do managers know how good employees are?   Or even if they do know, can they make the distinction to employees without using performance appraisal jargon?  

If you are a manager who struggles in this area, or if you just want more options for talking about good versus bad performance, try looking at performance through the lens of how employee behaviors contribute to the achievement of team, office, and organization goals.  Below are “seven” examples to help you do that.  For each example, note that the operative word is positively.  High-Performers make positive contributions, Low-Performers do not make positive contributions.  

1. Communicates with customers in a way that positively contributes to the achievement of team, office, and organization goals

2. Works with coworkers in a way that positively contributes to the achievement of team, office, and organization goals

3. Manages workloads in a way that positively contributes to the achievement of team, office, and organization goals

4. Manages personal and professional development in a way that positively contributes to the achievement of team, office, and organization goals

5. Adheres to policies, procedures, and regulations in a way that positively contributes to the achievement of team, office, and organization goals

6. Participates in meetings and other activities in a way that positively contributes to the achievement of team, office, and organization goals

7. Manages change in a way that positively contributes to the achievement of team, office, and organization goals

Employees who make these types of contributions, stand out among the crowd.   They do the right thing at the right time.  And they don’t need prodding or cajoling.  So the next time you want to make the distinction for yourself or need to explain the difference to a self-identified high-performer, consider these “seven” measures.

 

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